Teaching Children About Money by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth

by Susan A. Haid

Parents often wonder if and when their children should learn the value of money whether it is through an allowance or otherwise. My children, like many children in today’s material society, started asking for every toy under the sun as soon as they could talk. Of course, I admit that initially I enjoyed giving my kids the toys they asked for, but I soon learned that this is a bottomless money pit with no easy way out.
So as soon as my kids were able to count, I started teaching them how to count pennies, nickels and dimes. When they had earned several coins that they could put in their own wallets, I allowed them to spend it as they wished, helping them to understand what they were able to buy with the very small amount of money they had in their possession. What was interesting to observe is that they started to develop discernment about what they would choose to purchase rather than simply wanting everything and expecting to get every toy on the market.
Another beautiful evolution that occurred, although this required some work on my part as well as theirs, is that they began to understand the value of saving their money so that they could have greater purchasing power. As my children got a little bit older (5-6 years old), they began to cultivate the patience needed to wait for a something they wanted while they slowly saved up for it. Immediate gratification was no longer part of their world. They needed to have the discipline and responsibility to earn money for the items they wanted to buy with the exception of the gifts they received on birthdays and holidays for the most part.
Money has been a tool of empowerment in our house. Money must be earned by the performance of chores and duties outside of the normal expected duties. Money must be saved by each one of us including the parents. After all, parents represent the standard for the children. My kids now understand why Mommy doesn’t drive a brand new car or why we can’t go out to dinner whenever we feel like it. My kids also don’t argue when I tell them they can’t have this or that when we are in a store buying necessities.
I want to instill in my children that they have the power to make money and buy the things they wish to have. I do not want to impose fear-based thinking or poverty consciousness. I simply want to teach my kids how to make money and how to use it wisely. My kids have learned discernment, patience and responsibility in the process. These tools, and that is all they are, will serve them well as they get older.
The next step in my children’s education about money has been about how to make money creatively and joyfully without necessarily having to toil away for it. But that discussion is for another time. Meanwhile, for more exciting books and DVD’s that empower parents and children, learn about Lily’s Truth by Susan A. Haid at http://www.lilystruth.com.

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Smokin’ Hot Mama by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth

by Susan A. Haid

Over the past 46 years of my life, I have learned a thing or two about myself. There has been nothing extraordinary about me or my life circumstances. I am an ordinary woman who has lived an ordinary life. Well, except for the part of me that talks to dead people. But hey, other than that one little thing, I’m just a normal gal. That is another story for another time. In spite of my otherwise conventional life, I have come to a place where I can fully accept myself…all of me…the good, the bad, the ugly, the normal and the not-so-normal. Although this might seem to be a natural evolution of maturity, it is actually a profound transformation that forever changes everything. What I now know is that a little bit of “crazy” can be a good thing, a very good thing indeed.
You see, when I started to live freely without self-judgment, then I started truly living. I no longer care about the full figure I am wearing at midlife. Instead, I can see my own beauty, even if society cannot. I wear clothes that are comfortable, flowing and lovely. I no longer worry about dieting. I concern myself only with joy, health and balance. Happiness certainly must be correlated with health and longevity, but I don’t need a scientific study to prove it. If I happen to die a premature death, I die a happy person. So there you are.
Later in life, I have taken up belly dancing, opera singing and painting just for the fun of it. I don’t expect to be very good at these things but I do have fun. At this point in life, having fun is, well, just so much more fun than being good. And I love that I don’t have any rules to follow…hmmm, when did the rules get to be so important anyway?
When I am with other people, I don’t care about anything other than just having a good time. In fact, my bottom line has become all about the fun factor. I now choose to be around people who can laugh and be merry, who are lighthearted and joyful, and yes, who can party like there is no tomorrow. Although it may be irreverent, I can laugh at almost anything. After throwing a party, I chuckle at the number of wine bottles in my recycle bin.
I love to be with people who are accepting and free-spirited. I seek out friends who have no need or desire to view the world through the eyes of judgment and control. I believe in progress through conscious awareness but not through moral condemnation. The one thing I still need to work on is my acceptance of self-righteous, condemning people; I avoid them like the plague and have not found my peace within their presence as of yet. In fact, these folks irritate me more than anyone else, at least for now. In spite of my overall Zen demeanor, these types still cause me to bristle. But my new, enlightened strategy is to find a way to joke about it. My current irritations are great fodder for some very funny stuff as you might imagine; humor really does diffuse the irritation.
I engage in conversations freely and openly, no longer worrying about what I might say. I am authentic and true to myself. I try to laugh as much as possible whenever and wherever possible. I am serious by nature, but I am learning the art of living with grand humor. I have learned to laugh at myself, and OMG, I am hilarious.
It no longer matters to me that my kids are not the most well-behaved children on the block or may not get the best grades. What matters to me is that they are learning through their own experience and cultivating their own brand of wisdom of which self-acceptance is a part. In liberating myself, I have unwittingly liberated my children. This alone is profound and very blessed.
I don’t worry about morality because that is just another form of judgment and control. Instead I live by my one cardinal rule which is Compassion. My life became very simple and unencumbered when I finally let go of all my silly judgments and rules. I didn’t suddenly become wildly reckless and outrageously irresponsible as a result. I have become instead deeply loving and accepting of all people and all ways of living. This also helped me see the world quite clearly. Mostly, I can feel my own joy, and it feels really, really good.
In my past life, I had a perfect body, a gorgeous face and lots of attention from men (not to mention a whole boatload of repression). Today, what really tickles my fancy is that it is no longer the men who tell me that I’m sexy, it’s the women. I have had many women blurt out that they think I’m sexy, and I can assure you that there is nothing about me that meets our cultural standard of “sexy.” I am full-figured, fine-lined, stretch-marked, saggy, baggy and perfectly, ecstatically, joyfully happy. I have thrown my head back and laughed out loud more than once when told by a woman that I am sexy. However, what these women are sensing is an inner sexy that has nothing to do with superficial appearances.
I am wearing the look of genuine warmth, joy, peace and acceptance, and these attributes are monumentally magnetic in a world weary of surface appearances, masks and games. In telling my story, I am telling the story of liberation, acceptance, true happiness and lasting beauty that never ages, needs Botox or loses sex appeal. At midlife, I am one smokin’ hot mama.
If I am fortunate enough to become a smokin’ hot granny, I hope I am that ridiculous old gal who wears a rhinestone-studded cowboy hat, an oversized t-shirt and thigh-high vinyl boots when she dances for her lover. I hope I break a few ribs with extreme, insufferable, side-splitting laughter. I hope I have a few too many glasses of cabernet and way too much chocolate. I hope I love everyone I meet with shameless, furious, passionate abandon. I hope to become an eccentric old bird who didn’t waste a moment of her life on the things that don’t really matter. If I get my way, I have about 40 smokin’ hot years left, and there’s no good reason I can think of for turning back now.
Does this mean I am going to ride off naked into the sunset on a Harley? Maybe it does. And from now on, when you hear me counting calories, I am just figuring out how hot it’s getting in here. Oh, and can you pass me a fork? I’m digging in…

For more information about Susan A. Haid and Lily’s Truth visit www.lilystruth.com.

The ZEN of Parenting by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth

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by Susan A. Haid

The world is full of spiritual ideals, and for this, I am grateful. There is nothing I love more than delving into the bigger picture of who we are and why we are here. Exploring consciousness is such a marvelous journey, but at the end of the day, I also embrace the most practical, applicable elements of my discoveries and new understandings. What I laugh about is how often I hear the same spiritual truths over and over again, yet each time I have a deeper appreciation of their eternal meaning. As I continue to grow and evolve, as we all do, I get a clearer and more beautiful picture of life and its inherent wisdom.
Applying wisdom to parenting is certainly experimental is some ways yet not entirely so. And you certainly don’t need to have years and years of parenting experience under your belt to parent with ease and with joy. You also don’t need to have years of spiritual seeking behind you to parent with wisdom. I have three children. As every parent knows, every day is a new adventure, a new experience and a new challenge. What I am learning to do is come to the parenting process with a clean canvas in every moment. I have learned with practice to get out of my head. The thinking mind has its own set of beliefs and its controls. This is fine to a point.
Now, I am not proposing unconscious parenting devoid of logic or reason. What I am proposing instead is very conscious parenting; this type of parenting requires us to let go of all our preconceived ideas and controls imposed by our thinking mind. When we sit in the space of inner stillness, the place of no judgment or control, we actually open the door to higher understanding. We give ourselves the room to perceive events from a place that is truly a superior form of intelligence…the type of expansive intelligence that might be called intuitive. We then use our thinking mind to apply this innate and pure wisdom to our life circumstances.
So many people believe that wisdom must be earned but I can tell you otherwise. Step outside of your thinking mind from time to time and give yourself the gift of “no thought.” Simply allow yourself to be in this place of seeming nothingness, which is actually a pool of unlimited potentials. Play with this exercise as you parent your children. As you develop your skill, you will have amazing insights into yourself, your children, and your family among other things. You just may discover that the answers you’re looking for are innate to you. You may be able to let go of all your controls and find out that there is another way to parent that is better for you as well as for your kids.
Yes, this takes some conscious effort, but the rewards are worth it. The answers may come when you least expect them. The most beautiful part of intuitive parenting is that the answers and solutions are unique to you and your family. This does not imply that you cannot draw solutions from all around you, but it does imply that you are the final authority. This is an empowered way to live and to parent. It is a new way to find creative solutions and solve problems.
Much like the artist who works upon a clean canvas with each new creation, you can step outside of the ideas of your thinking mind and work from a very pure place of higher understanding to create your life in the most beautiful, original and unconventional way.
Although it has been said before, your life is your art. Why work from a soiled canvas when there is a clean, new one waiting for you?
For more exciting information about conscious parenting and raising children in wonderful new ways, or for more information about Lily’s Truth and Susan Haid, visit http://www.lilystruth.com.

Critical Factors for Raising an Empowered Child, Part 2: Teaching Children About Death by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth: a DVD for Empowering Parents and Kids

Freedomby Susan A. Haid

Teaching children about death depends of course on what you believe about death yourself. This article is based on my own personal experience with death and how I have handled the subject with my own children. These recommendations are for parents and caregivers who believe in the eternal nature of the soul. These recommendations are for those who want to change the old viewpoint of death replacing it with a new and enlightened understanding of what death really is. Ultimately, this is a gift to our children because they will have the opportunity to live, and die, peacefully without fear.
As the teachers of our children, death is something we must come to understand ourselves. It is critical that we move beyond the domain of “beliefs” into the realm of experience. We can teach our children what we believe or we can teach our children from the standpoint of our experience. There is no finer teacher than experience itself.  All we ever really need is an open mind to receive pure, unadulterated knowledge.
Now, here we could get into a lengthy conversation about “consciousness” and how it is NOT confined by the human body. Consciousness can travel anywhere at any time and knows no limits. This can be experienced by anyone and everyone in a body or not in a body.  So, what does this tell you about death?  Maybe it implies that death is simply a change of focus so to speak. Now, some would say that the experience of consciousness is just product of the imagination. But for those of us who have played with journeys in consciousness, well, our experiences simply cannot be explained away. Our experiences go far beyond the realm of the imagination and are powerful lessons in the true nature of the soul. So, because of my own vast experience over the past 25 years, I smile at the limited and controlled point-of-view that leads some people to deny the unlimited nature of our being. And if you need your own proof, I encourage you to seek and you will find.
This brings us back to the very basic lessons we give our children about death. Based on this very brief conversation, this is what we can teach our kids:

Lesson Number 1: Death is not an end to life, it is a continuation of life.  As all scientists know, energy never dies it simply changes form.  We never die, we simply change form.

Lesson Number 2: We are not just human beings, we are Consciousness Beings. Consciousness is not confined to the human body. It can move anywhere at any time. Death is a release of Consciousness from the human body only. This is all death really is…much like taking off your heavy winter coat and walking from one room to another. And remember that Consciousness is Unlimited. There are many amazing implications to being an Unlimited Being. Children are not yet locked down within the trap of limited belief systems…let them live freely and openly with very simple information that supports the truth of their existence and life experience. There is just no need for oppressing, complex teachings.

Lesson Number 3: Our reality is defined by our beliefs. Let us give our children the greatest gift of all by releasing all fear teachings about judgment and condemnation associated with death. These are very old beliefs that are based upon control. In my humble opinion, it is a violation of the pureness of a child to impose fear, judgment and condemnation into the heart of a child. And how can any person die in peace with any dignity whatsoever when they are wracked with guilt, fear and shame? For many of us, COMPASSION is the single most important teaching we can engender in our children. When compassion is rooted firmly in the heart of any person, there is truly no need for teachings based upon fear, shame, guilt and control. I have three loving, kind and generous children. I speak from experience.

Death is a part of life. In our family, we have experienced the transition of those who were very, very old and those who where very, very young. Death is never an easy event to face. But death is something we can experience through new eyes in a new way. Death can be experienced with dignity, honor and sweet celebration of the life lived. What is never to be forgotten is that death in not a final goodbye, it is simply a change of residence.

For more exciting information about raising empowered children, Lily’s Truth, or Susan A. Haid, visit www.lilystruth.com. What’s Your Truth? Take the journey…

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