The Power of Unstructured Learning by Susan A. Haid

The Power of Unstructured Learning

If you are an enlightened, conscious parent, teacher or caregiver, then we have something special for you! We’ve put together a short video production designed to keep new ideas and inspiration flowing. Ultimately, we desire to be part of the movement to create new, gentle and evolved approaches for guiding our children. It doesn’t matter if you’re a parent, teacher or caregiver. If you consider yourself to be a highly progressive individual  who is on board with the evolution of conscious work with kids, then click on the link below and take a listen…

http://radiantartscenter.com/Radiant_Arts_Center/Artists_Gallery.html

For more information about enlightened, conscious parenting, teaching and caregiving, visit www.radiantartscenter.com, www.lilystruth.com and www.peaceoutproject.com.

 

The Telling Hug by Susan A. Haid, Founder, Peace Out Project

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Last week I was teaching a chapter from the Peace Out Project to a classroom of upper elementary school children. For those of you who don’t know about the Peace Out Project, this is a peace promotion, bully prevention program.

The chapter I was teaching is entitled “True Heart”, and this chapter gives the facts about the extreme abuse that Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender youth experience on a day-to-day basis.  It tells the truth about the isolation, deep despair and desperation these kids feel.

The kids in my class, as always, were truly compassionate about the topic. There was no giggling, joking or awkwardness. They were totally cool with the entire presentation, and actually, had a lot to add about respect and sensitivity towards GLBT peers and classmates. So awesome.

After the chapter was complete, one boy ran up to me, wrapped his thin arms tightly around my waist and hugged me with the abandon of a soul newly unleashed. I was surprised, to say the least, but I didn’t really know why I was gifted with such a spontaneous show of sincere appreciation.  I gladly accepted the gift and gratefully returned the hug.

Days later, this child remarked, “I never heard anyone say it was OK to be gay before.”

Humph.

I’m now treated regularly to wonderful hugs from my dear little friend.  To witness the change in his self-worth is what is so tremendously gratifying and what the Peace Out Project is all about.   I believe this child now sleeps better at night than ever before because he knows that his dad is more than OK, his dad is perfectly beautiful.  I’m sleeping pretty good too.

The kids in this class understand how important the concepts of acceptance and compassion are.   But for them, these are more than “concepts”.  Just ask them, and they’ll tell you all you need to know.  And, you’ll also see what brilliant, open-hearted teachers they are.  You can’t help but get the message.

After all, doesn’t a hug ever so simply say it all?

For more information about the Peace Out Project, visit www.peaceoutproject.com.

Parenting With Ease: The Lost Art Of Listening by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth

by Susan A. Haid

One of the best things we can do as parents is simply listen, with an open mind and an open heart, to our children. We represent the safe space, so to speak, where our kids can say exactly what they’re thinking and feeling without judgment. This is a very, very important role we play and not to be underestimated in it’s influence on our child’s development. As parents, we often feel the need to guide or control our children, and although this role has its place, sometimes the very best thing we can do is listen, just listen. When we become the sounding board for our kids, we give them the opportunity to figure things out for themselves and feel supported in their experiences. Expect that what your kids will say will be contradictory, full of emotion, or drama, or self-centeredness. This is O.K.   Kids need to vent just like adults do. We don’t need to make every conversation a life lesson.   When we simply listen with presence, we have created a place where kids are free to express themselves openly then let those energies lie until the answers emerge on their own.   When children know they have your presence and support in this way, they are free to think and feel without fear, without control, without guilt or shame.   The answers they will come up with, then, will be clear, empowered and honoring of the self.  Of course, there will be times when lengthly, guiding conversations are necessary. But most of the time, our job as a parent is very simple: listen.   This takes a lot of pressure off of the job of parenting. Try it and and see.   It seems to work miracles, but the real miracle is the natural wisdom that exists within your child.

For more refreshing ideas about new ways to parent and empower your child, and for new and exciting concepts, visit www.lilystruth.com.

The Effective Parent by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth

A Tool for Effective Parents & Empowered Kids

A Tool for Effective Parents & Empowered Kids

By Susan A. Haid

Here are Ten Principles of the Effective Parent:

1) Offer your children committed love. Let your children know, without a shadow of a doubt, that you love them and you will always love them no matter what. Make this a clear and consistent message.

2) Become the best educator of your children’s basic life skills that you can be. This is far more valuable than what you can ever buy them.

3) Teach your children to trust themselves more than anything else. Keep your children connected to their innate inner navigational equipment. Do not underestimate the power of self-trust; this is one of the greatest gifts you will ever give your child.

4) Give your children reasonable freedom to make choices for themselves. There is only one finer teacher than you are, and that is life experience itself.

5) Give your children the gift of time to themselves without tv or technology. This opens the doorway to imaginative play that cultivates a powerful, lasting form of creativity and resourcefulness that serves a child for a lifetime.

6) Make every effort to offer compassion to your child, even when discipline or consequences are required. Children are learning and therefore require explanations, education and understanding more than anything else. Make compassion your best friend.

7) Listen to what your children have to say, even if their words are contradictory. They have a lot to figure out in a very complex world. Listen and be present.

8) Give your children reasonable, basic responsibilities. Everyone in a household should contribute to the welfare of the family.

9) Enjoy your children for who they are. As parents, we have no other responsibility other than to honor and appreciate who our children already are.

10) Stop whatever you are doing and openly accept and receive your child’s love. Revel in it! Take the time to bask in it as often as possible. There is no greater gift you will ever receive. Let it heal you.

For helpful information about joyful, effective parenting and raising empowered children, visit www.lilystruth.com for more.

How to Raise a Happy Kid: Part 1 by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth, www.lilystruth.com

by Susan A. Haid

When all is said and done, as parents and caregivers, more than anything else we want our children to be happy.   In providing for our child’s happiness, where does our responsibility begin and where does it end?  As a mother of three active, inquisitive and involved children, I can tell you that my kids never stop asking for what they want.  If I obliged every request, there would be no end to the fulfilment of their needs and desires.   And in this puzzle, where do I fit in?

Being a happy Mom is also part of the formula, you see.  My kids, like most other kids their age, are involved in sports, music, dance and more.  They also have a very active social life with their friends.  As you know, this requires a big commitment on my part to ensure that all of these activities happen on a regular basis.

So, on the days when we don’t have plans readily in place comes the inevitable question, “What are we doing today?” which is always followed by the expected yet incessant response, “I’m bored.”

In empowering my children, I realize that my kids must learn to take responsibility for managing their own happiness when they have time to themselves.  Now, we all know what kids do when they’re bored. They fight with each other.  It’s a game for them, it’s fun and it kills time.  This also can push even the likes of Mother Theresa over the edge within a matter of seconds.

So what is a parent/caregiver to do?  I have learned that a good measure of patience is required to get through the initial phase of boredom kids will experience.  Then there is the consequent whining, pouting and demanding that will initially ensue.  This is when I make a few firm, non-negotiable statements to my children that today they must entertain themselves.  Ofcourse, the emotional manipulations continue for a good long while, but then my kids seem to figure something out.

I have watched my kids make choices to entertain themselves based on the resources they have at home.   This is the birthplace of imaginative play and creative activities. This is when my kids walk out the door to play with rocks, sticks, dirt and grass.  This is when they enter the magical and wondrous world of their imaginations.  It’s getting beyond the initial resistance that is the hardest part.  I have learned to stand my ground and not give in to the whining, complaining and demanding because something wonderful is about to happen.

Some of the most beautiful experiences I have had in teaching my kids to take responsibility for entertaining themselves has occurred while we have been outdoors.  Out in the forest or by a stream, there is so much naturally available to keep a kid occupied without the crutch of a computer game, ipod or television.   Once a child gets immersed in nature, hours will pass by without a peep.  The next amazing thing that happens is that the child begins to relax and let go of the need to seek stimulation from other people or from technology.  With every hour a child is submersed in the magical world of nature, the child innately returns to his or her own peaceful state of being.  This is so healthy for our children.

Kids need down time.  Kids need time to be alone with themselves.  Some kids are better at being alone than others, but inevitably, time alone (preferably out in nature) is profoundly healing and balancing for each and every child.  It is also deeply restful and nuturing for parents and caregivers. 

Every now and then, make a point to walk away from life completely.  Teach your kids how to do it to.   Teach your kids also how to enjoy their own company.  This may seem inconsequential, but you have just unwittingly instructed your children on how to manage their own happiness.  This is simple, elegant and empowering.  This will bring peace and balance to your family and your life.  This will teach your children how to care for themselves and their tender inner spirits.   Everyday life is stressful for everyone, but you can always choose to leave it all behind for a few hours at a time.   This is a skill we teach our children by example.

Saying “no” to the constant demands to provide for a child’s happiness and “yes” to a child’s opportunity to fill their own time in a peaceful and nurturing setting is a great way to empower your child.   Give your children the gift of themselves.  Help them to become supremely comfortable in their own energy.  You are supporting the development of their sovereignty in doing so, and this is a most beautiful and blessed unfolding that is a result of liberating the inner spirit.

For more information about empowering kids, teens and families, or for more information about Susan A. Haid and Lily’s Truth, visit www.lilystruth.com for more exciting details.

Words Are Magic! by Amanda van der Gulik…Excited Life Enthusiast!

by Amanda van der Gulick

Juliet:

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2) 

A familiar quote by Shakespear.

If we had never known what a rose was but saw it for the very first time and were told that it was called a ‘skunk cabage’ (and had no idea what a ‘skunk’ was) then we would think the name ‘skunk cabage’ was a beautiful, romantic name simply because the flower itself was so sweet and pure.

But if we knew what a ‘skunk’ was then our beautiful rose would suddenly seem much less sweet!

Words are magic!

We must be very careful which words we choose to use in our daily lives.

Words can inspire and lift us to great heights, but they can also be our downfall, they can crumble us, make us cringe and hide in a corner full of cobwebs and broken dreams.

Which words do you choose to use?

“I can’t afford that.”

or

“How can I afford that?”

It seems of little importance how we speak about a subject, but therein lies the beast!

We don’t even realise we are doing it. We put ourselves down daily, we put our hopes and aspiritions down without a second thought.

Why?

We were taught to do it!

Our parents told us, “Money doesn’t grow on trees!”

They were wrong! MONEY DOES GROW ON TREES!

It’s all about perception. Is your glass half full or half empty? It makes a difference.

Yes no matter how you say it that glass will still have one half with liquid and one with air, but how you see it will affect not the glass or the liquid within it but YOUR LIFE!

If you see it as half empty then you are missing so much!
You are closing yourself to life’s wonders and joys.

If you see it as half full then you are blessed. You will enjoy life.

But beware…

Negativity is so easy to enter your mind unexpectedly.

Make sure you see your own thoughts for what they are and make a point to correct yourself whenever you find yourself allowing a negative thought.

Never reprimand yourself for your negative thoughts, as that will only increase your negativity, instead, laught, giggle, and then kindly remind yourself of the possitive alternative.

Example:

“It’s raining outside, now my suit is going to get all wet and my day will be ruined!”

or

“Oh, silly me, who cares if my suit gets wet, it’ll dry and besides the rain really brings out my natural curls like no shampoo or conditioner ever could. This rain means, fresh grass and new flowers will be blooming. I’m going to have a fantastic day!!!”

It’s up to you.

Here’s to your success,

Cheers….Amanda van der Gulik…Excited Life Enthusiast!
http://www.TeachingChildrenAboutMoney.com/

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Now that your own mind has been OPTIMISTICALLY revamped, it’s time to get your kids thinking POSITIVELY, click below:
http://www.cleverdoughkids.com/mindmoviefreebie.html
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For more information helpful information, books & DVD’s designed to empower adults, kids and teens, also visit www.lilystruth.com.

Critical Factors for Raising an Empowered Child: Part 1, Teaching Children About Authority; A Lesson in Self-Knowledge by Susan A. Haid, Author/Producer, Lily’s Truth: a DVD for Empowering Parents and Kids

by Susan A. Haid

There are several simple but critically important keys for raising empowered children. We can give our kids the tools they need, starting at a very young age. These tools will empower them throughout their lives as they grow, yet they are core values that will evolve more fully as time passes. Let me first state that by core values, I am referring to values that develop and mature from within the child and are not imposed upon the child from the outside. The point is to nurture the growth of concrete navigational equipment that is rooted from within the child and stems from the child’s own personal life experience. This will result in a powerful form of self- knowledge, otherwise referred to here as “authority,” that is ultimately deeply empowering because it is the result of actual life experience. There is no better teacher than experience itself.
There are 17 basic fundamental concepts to begin with. In this article I will be addressing the first key concept which is authority. For kids, this can be a confusing subject depending on the information they are given. The bottom line, if we are to cultivate empowerment within a child, is that we must support our children in developing their innate understanding of themselves, who they are, what they think, what they feel, and what they believe. By this, I mean that we must help our children to understand themselves from the inside out first, rather than imposing concepts upon them from the outside. We must help our children not only to understand but also respect what they think, feel and believe about their life experiences. As parents, we must help our children learn to trust their feelings, instincts, thoughts and reactions. If we separate our kids from this basic and often protective information, we have unwittingly initiated their path of separation from themselves and their consequent ability to move through life in a way that is constructive and healthy.
We must become very good listeners who can listen without judgment. First and foremost, we must listen to, honor and respect the thoughts and feelings of our children. Why is this so important? You see, as a child tells us their story, our listening without imposing judgment or giving advice acknowledges the individuality of their experience and validates and values their thoughts and feelings. This allows the child’s own discovery process to unfold. This allows the child’s problem-solving abilities to develop. And most potently, this allows the child to remain fully connected to their innate and natural abilities to trust their own feelings, ideas, instincts and consequent decisions about their life experiences. This supports the development of a core value system that will be difficult to challenge because it comes from within and is based on personal, real world knowledge.
How important is this key concept of self-knowledge and authority? It is critical. By supporting kids in developing self-knowledge, we help them cut through the confusion. Confusion is based in having to weigh and balance who they truly are with who they feel they are supposed to be. There is only one true answer. In addition, often along with the development of self-understanding comes compassion, and what more valuable “core value” is true and abiding compassion?

As parents, we can give our children the confidence to trust themselves in any situation by nurturing their innate ability to choose what is compassionate for themselves and others.  This eliminates the possibility of selfish, self-serving behavior yet honors each person’s right to choose for themselves.  This also leads to the development of inner clarity so that abusive people and situations are seen for what they truly are.

This is true authority. It has absolutely nothing to do with the concept of power, and this is the type of guidance our children need to live healthy, happy, fulfilling lives.

For more helpful information about building authority within children, visit http://www.lilystruth.com where you will find more exciting and supportive details.

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